HYPOTHALAMIC STUDY

Each year, thousands of people struggle with Hypothalamic Obesity, or HO, a condition where the hypothalamus is damaged — a tiny part of the brain that controls when — and when not — to be hungry.

It’s a really difficult condition because many who are diagnosed with HO strive to be healthy, workout regularly and eat the right foods, but still cannot stop the hunger, or the gaining of weight.

Doctors are currently in the process of developing a research study, specifically focused on HO, and will begin selecting participants in the second half of 2021. It’s a research study that has a lot of excitement, and many people wanting to participate. Please read below to learn more information about HO & to sign up for more study information, or to be considered as a potential participant.


The hypothalamus is a tiny part of the brain that regulates homeostasis in the body. One such function includes its management of energy balance and hunger by pulling together the signals from the gut, fat cells, and the brain. It tells people when they are hungry and when they have had enough to eat.

When the hypothalamus has a genetic defect, or is injured, the brain and the gut have a hard time understanding each other’s signals. In other words, the brain cannot “hear” the messages from the body fat, trying to tell the brain to turn off hunger. This communication breakdown in the brain leaves a person with a low metabolic rate and often also with the feeling of constant hunger. The constant hunger often leads to over-eating — and the body will then begin to store the extra energy from the food as fat. This is a complicated medical condition called Hypothalamic Obesity, or HyOb.

Eventually, as one gains more and more weight, the body begins to store fat in places that it usually does not, like in the muscles, the liver and in and around other important organs in the belly. This makes it difficult for these important organs to work properly — and it can harm the person’s health!


Besides the feeling of non-stop hunger, the person with HyOb has other symptoms including decreased physical activity and fatigue, low metabolic rate, and daytime sleepiness. They may also feel short tempered or grouchy because the body makes more insulin — a hormone the body makes to help handle food. These symptoms together put the person at high risk for developing metabolic syndrome which can include type 2 diabetes, heart disease, high triglycerides, and extra visceral (belly) fat.

Until now there have been some medications with various measures of success to treat HyOb. Gastric Bypass Surgery has also been found to help with weight loss and managing hunger in people with HyOb


Doctors are currently in the process of developing a brand-new clinical research study for people suffering from HyOb. Research studies are sometimes called clinical trials and are important because they help identify new treatments for different diseases. Together with the doctors in charge, participants help new treatments become available to anyone who needs it and help to test whether the medical intervention they investigate is safe and effective.

The HyOb study will begin looking for participants shortly. If someone you know has been diagnosed with HyOb and might be interested in learning more about the study as well as possibly be notified when trial recruitment begins. Please share the link below and have them sign up.

The study is currently in the final stages. Please sign up if you are interested in learning more information, or possibly being selected as a participant. Please only sign up if you think you may be available for 6 weeks starting in June, as study spots are highly sought after and limited.

Sign Up →

WHAT IS A RESEARCH STUDY?

Research studies are sometimes called clinical trials and are important because they help identify new treatments for different diseases. Together with the doctors in charge, participants help new treatments become available to anyone who needs it.

These trials or studies are carefully organized and approved by independent organizations to test whether the medical intervention they investigate is safe and effective.